Saturday, January 22, 2011

Deep and surface

What the difference between deep and surface learning?

To see the difference let us look at the definitions of learning.


“Learning” means different things to different people. Säljö (1979) classified the conceptions held by respondents in his interview-based study into five categories:

1. Learning as a quantitative increase in knowledge. Learning is acquiring
information or “knowing a lot”

2. Learning as memorising. Learning is storing information that can be reproduced.

3. Learning as acquiring facts, skills and methods that can be retained and used
as necessary.

4. Learning as making sense or abstracting meaning. Learning involves relating
parts of the subject matter to each other and to the real world.

5. Learning as interpreting and understanding reality in a different way.
Learning involves comprehending the world by re-interpreting knowledge.

1, 2 & 3 is surface learning and 4 &5 Deep learning.


Read more: Deep and Surface learning http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/deepsurf.htm#ixzz1BjP3K000
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives

OBE

Why we need OBE

As we all know, Malaysian has produced graduates who do not meet expectations or standards, upon commencing work in the industry. Complains stated that our graduates are lacking in soft skills, unable to work independently and no creative enough to provide engineering solutions. Many blame our education system that
adopted the Traditional Education (TE) approach, a 'spoon-feeding' education has become synonymous with our education system. To overcome this problem, a revolitionize solution was adopted. OBe or outcome-based education. It's an innovative teaching and assessment approach where methods such as problem-based learning, project-based learning, case studies which includes literature searches, group projects and oral presentations are adopted.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

PARETO;s PRINCIPLE 80/20

Perbincangan dengan Pn SJ Pengarah Bahagian Kecemerlangan Instruktional yang melibatkan Pareto Principle.



Pengenalan.
Prinsip Pareto atau Hukum Pareto telah dihasilkan oleh seorang ahli ekonomi Itali bernama Vilfredo Pareto dalam tahun 1906. Vilfredo Pareto membina formula matematik bagi menerangkan ketidaksetaraan agihan kekayaan bagi negaranya dimana 20% daripada penduduknya menguasai 80 % kekayaan negara. Lewat tahun 1940an Dr. Joseph M. Juran pula mempopularkan atribut 80/20 hukum Pareto ini. Walaupun ia banyak digunakan dalam bidang pengurusan, Ia tidak dikenali sebagai Hukum Juran mungkin atas kejangalan sebutannya tetapi dikekalkan sebagi prinsip atau hukum Pareto atau Hukum 80/20.

Apakah yang dimaksudkan dengan Hukum 80/20 ini.
Menurut Juran hukum 80/20 ini adalah berasaskan kepada "vital few and trivial many". Ini bermaksud “anything a few (20 percent) are vital and many(80 percent) are trivial. 20 percent of something always are responsible for 80 percent of the results”. Lihat contoh-contoh di bawah:
i. 20 percent of the people owned 80 percent of the wealth.
ii. 20 percent of the defects causing 80 percent of the problems
iii. 20 percent of the work (the first 10 percent and the last 10 percent) consume 80 percent of your time and resources
iv. 20 percent of the defects causing 80 percent of the problems.
v. 80 percent of your stock comes from 20 percent of your suppliers
vi. 80 percent of your sales will come from 20 percent of your sales staff.
vii. 20 percent of your staff will cause 80 percent of your problems,
viii. 20 percent of your staff will provide 80 percent of your production.
ix. 80% of most tasks can be completed in 20% of the time



Pareto Analysis
Pareto Analysis is a simple technique for prioritizing possible changes by identifying the problems that will be resolved by making these changes. By using this approach, you can prioritize the individual changes that will most improve the situation.

Pareto Analysis uses the Pareto Principle – also known as the "80/20 Rule" – which is the idea that 20% of causes generate 80% of results. With this tool, we're trying to find the 20% of work that will generate 80% of the results that doing all of the work would deliver.

Step 1: Identify and List Problems

Firstly, write a list of all of the problems that you need to resolve. Where possible, talk to clients and team members to get their input, and draw on surveys, helpdesk logs and suchlike, where these are available.

Step 2: Identify the Root Cause of Each Problem
For each problem, identify its fundamental cause. (Techniques such as Brainstorming, the 5 Whys, Cause and Effect Analysis, and Root Cause Analysis will help with this.)

Step 3: Score Problems
Now you need to score each problem. The scoring method you use depends on the sort of problem you're trying to solve.For example, if you're trying to improve profits, you might score problems on the basis of how much they are costing you. Alternatively, if you're trying to improve customer satisfaction, you might score them on the basis of the number of complaints eliminated by solving the problem.

Step 4: Group Problems Together By Root Cause
Next, group problems together by cause. For example, if three of your problems are caused by lack of staff, put these in the same group.

Step 5: Add up the Scores for Each Group
You can now add up the scores for each cause group. The group with the top score is your highest priority, and the group with the lowest score is your lowest priority.

Step 6: Take Action
Now you need to deal with the causes of your problems, dealing with your top-priority problem, or group of problems, first. Keep in mind that low scoring problems may not even be worth bothering with - solving these problems may cost you more than the solutions are worth.

http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTED_01.htm

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

old stuff

A - ArchiBlog (a portal to architecture on the web)
B - Belly of an Architect
C - the Contemporist (a blog on contemporary design)
D - design duct
E - Elseplace (a blog by archinect editor, Orhan Ayyüce)
F - Floating Podium (Architectural News floating in the Blogosphere)
G - Grassroots Modern (bringing modern design to the masses)
H - Hipercroquis
I - Inhabitat
J - Jetson Green (popular blog about modern green architecture...get it Jetson green)
K - Karrie Jacobs (A blog about cities, buildings, and the spaces in-between)
L - Life Without Buildings (Architecture out of context by architect Jimmy Stamp)
M - Modern (Modern Houses | Modern Architects | Modern Design)
N - Notes on Becoming a Famous Architect
O - Open Form Architecture (practice blog is a both a portfolio and inspiration)
P - Pruned (on landscape architecture and related fields)
Q - Quiet Observations from Archi-Hell (do you really need an explanation for this?)
R - rolu | dsgn (the blog of landscape designers meant more for inspiration than advertisement - it is energetic and enjoyable)
S - Space Invading (an image feed of architecturally-relevant blog posts, created by the fine folks at archinect)
T - Tropolism
U + Um Arquiteto em Brasilia (in Portuguese)
V - Veritas et Venustas (a new urbanist, but I forgive him)
W - the WonderSphere (another archinect regular, Emily Kemper's musings on architecture, sustainability, travel, design and....brunch)
X - find one or start one for inclusion
Y - ykbk (a passionate blog about the act of design through hand drawings)
Z - Zora (a multilingual blog on architecture)

Thursday, December 30, 2010

INFOGRAPHICS

Dalam dunia yang mencabar ini sesuatu komunikasi akan jadi berkesan jika ia dibentangkan dengan cara yang efektif. Untuk itu sewajarnya ini dapat dijadikan satu wadah baru dalam dunia pengurusan.

INFOGRAPHICS


Infographics or information graphics are information conveyed by graphic elements, including charts, graphs, etc., often contained in print media intended to communicate complex information quickly and clearly.. Among the most common graphics elements are horizontal bar charts, vertical column charts, and round or oval pie charts, that can summarize a lot of statistical information. Diagrams can be used to show how a system works, and may be an organizational chart that shows lines of authority, or a systems flowchart that shows sequential movement. Illustrated graphics use images to related data. The snapshots features used every day by USA Today are good examples of this technique

In short infographics

1. It's a visual explanation that helps you more easily understand, find or do something.
2. It's visual, and when necessary, integrates words and pictures in a fluid, dynamic way.
3. It stands alone and is completely self-explanatory.
4. It reveals information that was formerly hidden or submerged.
5. It makes possible faster, more consistent understanding.
6. It's universally understandable

Examples of InfoGraphics



Saturday, December 25, 2010

THE POWER OF OATS

Teringat nak cari info tentang oats dan kesihatan dan nampak yang ini ada kebaikannya.


Cholesterol and Heart
Benefits of eating oats on cholesterol and heart
Oatmeal and oat bran are significant sources of dietary fiber. This fiber contains a mixture of about half soluble and half insoluble fibers. One component of the soluble fibre found in oats is beta-glucans, a soluble fiber which has proven effective in lowering blood cholesterol. Here's how it works. Soluble fiber breaks down as it passes through the digestive tract, forming a gel that traps some substances related to cholesterol, such as cholesterol-rich bile acids. This entrapment reduces the absorption of cholesterol into the bloodstream. The bad cholesterol, LDL, is trapped without lowering good cholesterol (HDL). Oats and grains are also one of the best sources of compounds called tocotrienols. These are antioxidants which together with tocopherols form vitamin E. The tocotrienols inhibit cholesterol synthesis and have been found to lower blood cholesterol. The accumulation of cholesterol is implicated in many types of cardiovascular disease. Oats, like all cholesterol-lowering agents, are most effective when consumed as part of a low-fat, high-fiber diet taken together with plenty of exercise. The beneficial health effects of oats are best if ½-1 cup (1½-3 ounces) of oats are eaten every day. One study found that the 1/10th ounce (3 grams) of soluble fiber from this amount of oatmeal decreased total cholesterol by approximately 2%, which correlates to a 4% decrease in coronary artery disease. Another study showed 1½ ounces (43 grams) of oatmeal resulted in a loss of 3% in total cholesterol and a 14% reduction in bad cholesterol after two months. Another study found that a 6-8 week diet of 1½-3 ounces (43-85 grams) of oat bran daily lowered total cholesterol by 20% and bad cholesterol (LDL) by as much as 25%. Another study found 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of oat bran (one-third of a cup of oat bran eaten twice a day) lowered cholesterol up to 15%. New research has also discovered that the antioxidants found in oats reduce cholesterol by reducing the ability of blood cells to stick to the inside of artery walls. So in other words, eat a cup of oats a day and you'll be okay!

http://www.eatmoreoats.com/health.html

Oats for High Cholesterol

Oats contain high levels of dietary fiber, manganese, selenium, and magnesium. Numerous studies showed that a diet high in beta-glucan from oats help to lower blood LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol). Oats may also help stabilize blood glucose levels, which may benefit people with diabetes. Studies show that in people with high cholesterol (above 220 mg/dl), consuming just 3 grams of soluble oat fiber per day typically lowers total cholesterol by 8 to 23 percent. 3 g of soluble oat fiber can be found in just one bowl of oatmeal - it can be that easy!

http://www.healthcastle.com/oats-cholesterol.shtml


Oats, 1 cup
Nutrient Units 1.00 X 1 cup (156g)
Proximates
Water g 12.82
Energy kcal 607
Energy kj 2540
Protein g 26.35
Total lipid (fat) g 10.76
Ash g

2.68
Carbohydrate, by difference
g

103.38
Fiber, total dietary
g

16.5
Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg

84
Iron, Fe
mg

7.36
Magnesium, Mg
mg

276
Phosphorus, P
mg

816
Potassium, K
mg

669
Sodium, Na
mg

3
Zinc, Zn
mg

6.19
Copper, Cu
mg

0.977
Manganese, Mn
mg

7.669
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg

0.0
Thiamin
mg

1.190
Riboflavin
mg

0.217
Niacin
mg

1.499
Pantothenic acid
mg

2.104
Vitamin B-6
mg

0.186
Folate, total
mcg

87
Folic acid
mcg

0
Folate, food
mcg

87
Folate, DFE
mcg_DFE

87
Vitamin B-12
mcg

0.00
Vitamin B-12, added
mcg

0.00
Vitamin A, IU
IU

0
Vitamin A, RAE
mcg_RAE

0
Retinol
mcg

0
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated
g

1.899
12:0
g

0.037
14:0
g

0.023
16:0
g

1.613
18:0
g

0.101
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated
g

3.398
16:1 undifferentiated
g

0.020
18:1 undifferentiated
g

3.377
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated
g

3.955
18:2 undifferentiated
g

3.781
18:3 undifferentiated
g

0.173
Cholesterol
mg

0
Amino acids
Tryptophan
g

0.365
Threonine
g

0.897
Isoleucine
g

1.083
Leucine
g

2.003
Lysine
g

1.094
Methionine
g

0.487
Cystine
g

0.636
Phenylalanine
g

1.396
Tyrosine
g

0.894
Valine
g

1.462
Arginine
g

1.860
Histidine
g

0.632
Alanine
g

1.374
Aspartic acid
g

2.259
Glutamic acid
g

5.791
Glycine
g

1.312
Proline
g

1.457
Serine
g

1.170
Other
Alcohol, ethyl
g

0.0

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18 (2005)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY




HAPPY BIRTHDAY NORISH....


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